• Food Chemistry
    • School of Agriculture & Biology
    • Credit. 2
    • FS300
    • Enroll
    • WILL BEGIN
    • Fall , 2015
    • 861
    • Course Description:
    • ( Exchange Programme )
    • The course applies basic scientific principles to food systems and practical applications. Food constituents, and chemical/biochemical reactions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and other constituents in fresh and processed foods are discussed with respect to food quality and safety. Reaction conditions and processes that affect color, flavor, texture, nutrition, and safety of food are emphasized. Students are given a role in the learning experience through independent projects related to real world problems associated with the food industry or food consumption.
    • Course Syllabus:
    • This course is designed to evaluate the chemical, physical and functional properties of food constituents and the effects of processing on those constituents. The course objectives are shown as followings:
      1. To learn the basic chemical structure, nomenclature, physiochemical properties of food components.
      2. To understand the basic chemical reactions related to food processing, food formulation, food quality and stability, and food nutrition.
      3. To understand the interactions of food components in food formulation, food processing, food safety, and food nutrition.
    • Schedule:
    • Topics / Credit hours / Teaching methodology / Tasks / Intended learning outcomes / Assessment methods

      1. Introduction / 2 Credit hours / Lecture / Understanding generally the course of Food Chemistry / Final exam
      2. Water / 2 Credit hours / Lecture / Water properties, water activity and food spoilage, water immigration, glass transition / Final exam
      3. Carbohydrate / 6 Credit hours / Lecture / Describe the mechanisms of Maillard reaction and find out where it happens in your daily life. The paper should be typed, with font type Times New Roman and size 12, and double spaced. The length should be 3 -5 pages. / Sugar structure, Non-enzymatic reaction, reducing sugar, disaccharides, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, starch, gelatinization, retrogradation. / Final exam
      4. Peptide and protein / 8 Credit hours / Lecture / Properties and classification of amino acids, structural properties of peptides and proteins, protein denaturation (foaming, dough development, etc.), / Final exam
      5. Lipids / 4 Credit hours / Lecture / Fatty acids, lipid structure, lipid reaction, lipid oxidation, antioxidants / Final exam
      6. Food Enzyme / 4 Credit hours / Lecture / Write a report about mechanisms of enzymatic browning and how to protect from it with a daily example. The paper should be typed, with font type Times New Roman and size 12, and double spaced. The length should be 3 -5 pages. / Enzymatic reaction, enzymatic browning(polyphenoloxidase reaction)/ Final exam
      7. Colors / 2 Credit hours / Lecture / Color theory, color space, synthetic colorants, natural colorants / Final exam
      8. Vitamins and Minerals / 2 Credit hours / Lecture / Classifications, loss in processing and storage, Vc browning reaction / Final exam
      9. Nutraceutical and toxicants / 2 Credit hours / Lecture / Classification, introduction. / Final exam
  • Reading list
  • Other Materials
  • Discussion
  • Homework download/submit
    • Jing Pu
    • Professor
    • Read more
    • Female
    • E-mail:
    • pjing@sjtu.edu.cn
    • Profile
    • Dr. Jing's research program investigates the basic chemical alterations of phytochemicals and bioactive components as a result of breeding, post-harvest process or processing, and developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying target secondary plant metabolites for biological significance and safety. Those bioactive compounds include plant pigments (particularly anthocyanins), fatty acids, and other phenolics that occur in foods with emphasis on substances of nutritional food quality significance related to chronic diseases. Additional investigations include characterizing the food-matrix interaction and how this influences bioavailability and metabolism of bioactivities and their physiological significance.
  • Prerequisite Course:

    Chemistry, Biochemistry, introduction to food science

  • Textbooks:

    1. Owen R. Fennema. Food Chemistry. New York, Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1996
    2. Belitz , H. D. and Grosch, W. Food Chemistry. Second Edition(English Version).New Yolk:Springer verlag, Berlin Heidelberg,1999
  • Grading:

    Class meetings are lectures and occasional discussions. Outside activities may include homework problems.
    30% / Problem Sets
    70% / Final Examination
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